Dear America,

I have gratefully and proudly been an Emergency Department and Trauma Travel Nurse for the past 4 years.  I have held your love ones hands as they have passed.  I have laughed with you when you came in for the boo-boos and the “hold my beer and watch this” mess-ups.  I have put my blood, sweat and tears into working as efficiently and effectively as I can to make sure your wait out in the triage room is not as long as it already is.  Someone dies, and I do my 30 seconds of silence next to them. Within minutes I am in another patient’s room smiling and holding my composure as if the last few minutes haven’t been difficult.

People don’t come into the ER because they feel great and sunshine is coming out their butts. If you come into the ER, it’s because you ARE in pain, and think you are in distress.  But emergent distress to us, is lack of oxygen, lack of circulation, organs injured, or potential loss of life and limb.  Doesn’t mean we don’t believe your pain, but pain doesn’t kill you. We know in the ER that your emergency feels more important than the person’s emergency next to you.  But what you need to know America, is that in the ER you don’t ever want to be first.  First means you have a chance of not walking out of those double doors.  First means that your family may not see you again.

I look around and I can see my co-workers running just as fast as I am.  All of them with the same intention; continuously asking who needs help or another thing they can do, in order to help see you, America, faster.  But I am struggling America.  I am struggling with the pace that I run at, and the difficulty of coming to work and continuing to smile when I walk into your room and you are already mad at me.  Your wait was an hour before you got to your room?  So you take this aggression out on me as I am diligently collecting your blood and determined to find out why you came in as you expect top-rate smiling customer service.  You are hungry.  You are thirsty.  You now have a cat scan ordered and are additionally mad at me for telling you not to eat or drink. I continue running room to room, with you still frustrated with me, America.  Frustrated that you had to wait on your blood work.  Frustrated you had to wait on the cat scan report.  Frustrated you are still hungry.  Frustrated the doctor hasn’t been back in.  Frustrated you didn’t get a warm blanket immediately after asking the first time.  And frustrated that your trip to the Emergency Department hasn’t ran as quickly as a McDonald’s drive-thru.

What you didn’t see during your wait is the ambulances coming in back-to-back.  The lady next to your room in respiratory distress requiring a team to stabilize her. The radiologist having 27 reports ahead of yours with a delay if another trauma patient comes in.  Even the patients not breathing or heart’s not beating still do not receive full-report scans or blood work faster than yours.  They get stabilized and their tests get bumped up the line before everyone. But the results take just as long as your tests.

But our chaos doesn’t stop.  Not in the full five hours that you’ve been visiting.  Not because it’s 0300 and you thought this would be the best time to get in-and-out.  Our staffing is cut in half at night, and sometimes to a third.  Not because it’s the hospital’s problem of inadequate staffing, but because it shouldn’t be staffing at 100% capacity through the night, health-care workers need rest too.Grandma needs help to the restroom.  Little Johnny just had a seizure.  Uncle Tom has kidney, liver, and heart failure in addition to his diabetes, COPD, and 10 other diagnosis’.  Pregnant Sarah continues to vaginally bleed.  And the nurse taking care of all of these people is getting heat from the doctor about the laboratory not running a blood specimen yet.  As the nurse sits down to chart Little Johnny’s seizure while calling the lab, a pass-by family member starkly comments, “look, they are just sitting there”.  Our jobs dilemmas are not like a computer malfunctioning. In fact, we can still operate really well if our charting systems go down.  We train for it.  But YOU AS PATIENTS are not computers.  You’re humans, and our every quick critically-thinking decision can mean life or death to a person.  It’s a heavy weight to carry at times.  And sometimes we don’t make a lightning speed plans of care when you don’t present so black-and-white. We don’t give you a medication ‘just because’ or withhold ‘just because’.  And for the love of God I do not know if you will be admitted without your tests back.  

We don’t do this job for the praise, because we don’t get it. We don’t do this for the insane vacation or money benefits, because it’s not insane.  If we weren’t passionate about our specific positions then trust me, we would have never made it through school.  When you come into our establishment with a lot of non-emergencies while treating us impolitely or ignorantly, it is wearing down our passion to want to help you.  It is just as frustrating as your really, really, really, bad days at work.  Just because you are in lack of control in the Emergency department, does not mean you can take it out on us that are here trying to HELP YOU.  And so I ask you America, if you’re going to visit me, and don’t have the best story or YouTube video to back up the cuss words coming out of your mouth from the pain, then you need to be nice.

And so I leave you,

The exhausted Emergency Nurse.

Advertisements

286 thoughts on “Dear America, you need to be nice.

  1. I have had many visits to a Doctor and ER for my failing health over the last 40 years. I have been treated like one of the family by all the nurses that have taken care of me. Recently I had two tragic health issues in my life and I had a nurse that sat down next to me and shared tears. I cannot say enough good about nurses.

    Like

    1. Nurses are heros in our house. I spent 3 months on hospital bed rest while pregnant with twins. My perinatologist did not think they would survive but it was the nurses day-in and day-out that would take care of me – not just taking vitals – but also there when I cried out of fear, and when I just needed a glass of water. On the day of my emergency c-section it was the ER nurse who got the entire medical team to stop panicking and get to work saving my babies and me. The NICU nurses were also phenomenal – nurturing my twins to health, and after 2 months in the NICU I got to bring my babies home – both healthy and strong. Since then I have brought them to the ER for non-emergencies on the weekends and late at night for things that could not wait the next day. The ER nurses have always been understanding and never made me feel embarrassed or like I was taking a room that someone else with more emergent needs should have.

      So grateful for everything you do. You are there for our scariest most painful moments. And you deserve to be thanked!

      Like

      1. Donna you must certainly work in some cozy little 9-5 office job if THAT is your response to this post. ER nurses get burned out, BUT they keep coming back. It isn’t burn out from the job, it’s burn out from jerks who think they’re sore throat or STD trumps cardiac arrest or respiratory distress. THAT’S what this post is about. Perhaps you should try walking (running) 15,000 steps a day EVERY DAY only to be treated like crap by someone that should have gone to their PCP. Wow.

        Liked by 5 people

      2. I dont know why this person (Donna) is being such a turd,But for the record….in case amyone O know reads her crappy retorts…I just want to make sure no one thinks it me saying this shit, I support the ER Nurse 100% and know the facts are correct. I am Donna Stanley,and not connected to that sour puss Donna in any way. Just want to make this point very clear

        Like

      3. Burnt out isn’t because you are a nurse. Burnt out is caused because the administration around you is constantly pushing the nurse to do more and not having adequate staff to keep up with the demands. Find another profession? Not hardly. Any nurse who says they are not suffering the burnt out issue, has a totally different job where your profession doesn’t require that you give excellent care,( short staffed )and where the nurse is acutely aware that the “customer” is always right regardless of the situation. How can someone have pressure from everyone expecting that the nurse should do everything, and not have the burnt out syndrome.? These nurses would never consider another profession because taking care of people and finding ways to bring wellness and comfort to their patients, are the main reasons they became nurses in the first place. So you can take your job and thank god you have no pressures because you could never be a nurse.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. I never thought about how hard it must be to be a nurse. True I couldn’t be one myself, I can’t stand needles, blood, etc. I would not make a good nurse, even though half my immediate family are nurses or nurses to be and am very proud of them all . Soon I will be a patient and I will think about this writing then, although I have always tried to be considerate, unlike some demanding attention seeking patients.

      Like

      1. Donna, I am a trauma nurse. You obviously are not working in an acute care facility and certainly have no clue about critical care/ emergent care nursing.

        Like

    3. I’m a RN that LOVES my profession but as mentioned in the above article it’s the conditions in which I have to perform my job that I HATE. This goes for ALL bedside nurses. NURSING is not as “glamorous” as it may seem. It’s HARD work and DEDACATION without recognition. So you have to LOVE it to continue to do it❤️

      Like

      1. DEDICATION…just sayin’… spelling is a thing for me lol and I am a nurse with over 28 years under my belt. Still love it…

        Like

      2. Sally, put a sock in it. being nice…jus sayin’. rude evil people don’t even belong in medicine. I am in medicine and have been for 33 years. You are just the type of trouble maker that I see everyday in my office. I’ve worked in almost every capacity in medicine with the exception of being a doctor or a nurse.
        You are the problem in these corporations that are being run by people who don’t even know medicine. If I knew where you worked I would report you.
        I bet you’re just a joy to work with aren’t you? Your co-workers talk about you behind your back. I know that because I’m in medicine. Rude, insensitive, uncaring people get talked about behind their backs in medicine. Also people in medicine who don’t know what they are doing. They are talked about the most behind the person’s back. I wonder if that’s you. probably is. Petty petty petty about spelling sometimes it spell check. I wish you could hear me telling you off.
        You are absolutely disgusting and you are the person that gives medicine and medical personnel a bad name.
        Now go back to being a troll and stay under your mushroom.
        If I were you I wouldn’t even answer back because then it will get very ugly.
        -A Medical Record Coder.

        Like

      3. Speaking about being rude…..My, I feel that you vented your ,maybe ,resentment through your rudeness…..your attitude. I hope that is whatever making you respond this way gets some resolution so you are a happier person.

        Like

      4. Well I must have pushed the wrong button and it put my real name out there anyway so come on bring it on come to my house whatever you feel you need to do look me up call me tell me off
        You won’t be the first one jealous of me that so badly that you can spit and you won’t be the last now kiss my ass in Times Square bring your camera! #ohnoyoumightputonsocialmedia
        I’ll be waiting Rockin in the corner of Times Square scared to death crying
        Just like you.

        Like

      5. I hope you find peace….I am hearing words from an angry person…..and I hope you are NOT an RN or an LPN or a CNA….Jealous of YOU??? Far from it; I am concerned. I have learned a lot in my 85 years, and that does not include harboring jealousy !!! Jealousy is negative, a waste of time and energy.

        Like

    4. EMT and all ER personnel, I want to state I have always treated you with the same level of respect that I was raised to give to police officers, fire fighters and other authorities. I’m on the high side of 50, and I still believe it’s required. You are working for the people you care for, and I understand if someone needs your attention more than me; I always do what I can to stay out of your way, make the time with me as short and pleasant so as not to interfere with those who need you more.
      At one time, I needed that kind of care, and when you’re hurting, and a nurse comes up and asks you how you are, and brings relief, they are akin to an angel, and there was one working a night shift I never got to thank for doing that for me; so I’ll thank all of you!
      We see the difficult, obnoxious, rude and nasty people, we those who are screaming in pain that cannot be relieved at the moment, I have been there when a loved one passes; and a professional will say that ALL of them deserve the best of your care.
      But I say it takes a certain kind of person to even consider this line of work, and I for one respect you for it. We know the money is but a small part of it…
      And you doing what God has commanded, caring for the sick, weeping with those who weep, rejoicing with those who rejoice; you are there when we are born, you’re there to help us be healthy, scold us when we do it wrong, help us when we’re sick, and comfort us and our loved ones when we leave life. You ARE family (I remember all the nurses who helped bring my children into the world!), and you are a part of our lives, part of what makes the world safe…
      THANK YOU!!!!…

      Like

    5. I can only imagine the frustration but I can honestly say that it is rare to go to an er and have a nurse that is actually nice! Remember as you’re taking care of the patient, that patient is scarred to death because of what is going on with them. The fact is you get to walk away when your shift is up but alot of people , when they walk away, are still seriously injured or permanently scared. I know that all to well when I walked into the er for what i thought might be bronchitis or pneumonia and it turned out to be metastatic breast cancer stage 4. So while you’re ripping America a new ass for being sick remember one thing, you chose this as a career and you can walk away…..

      Like

      1. Rare to find a nice nurse? I find this hard to believe. Just like our frequent fliers who complain about everyone and everything, but STILL keep coming back!

        Like

      2. Ginger, do you think we really just walk away after our shift without leaving a little piece of ourselves behind each time we lose the fight against illness or death? I can tell you about so many of my patients and experiences because they are carved into my soul. Yes, the patients have to live with their illness or injury, but we live with experiencing all of them — not the same thing, certainly, but still not an easy thing. We in ER/trauma are masters of compartmentalizing because we have to be to make it through our shifts. When I go to see a new patient in one of my beds, that patient will never know that I was just on the losing end of a pediatric code that was a shaken baby. So if we’re not super warm, sometimes it’s because we are trying to maintain composure after seeing the worst of humanity. It does not mean that we don’t care; we usually care too much, and it takes a toll. Walking away is not a simple option, though a change of scenery may help some. Be well, Ginger.

        Like

      3. Joann Griswold go to hell I don’t care what you have to say either. You don’t know anything about me probably just jealous because I told her off and talked about my career.
        Unless you’re going to write me a letter of recommendation for the job I’m going to be applying for after I am out of a contract I don’t give a shit what you say.
        You writing that letter of recommendation for anybody else yet? If you are that would be a miracle you don’t seem like the type of person that would want to help anybody anyway.
        How about this send me your resume you need a letter of recommendation I’ll write one for you based on all your experience and all that you’ve done in medicine.
        Put a sock in it. Joanne who is so important that you had to use your name because you’re the greatest thing since sliced bread aren’t you? Now how’s that for rude??
        You want more? Keep coming back.
        Report me block me eew eew eew.
        I’m so skeekerd. Let me go and sit in that corner and rock myself to sleep with a sheet over my head oh my goodness whatever shall I do! you tell me because you know everything okay???
        Let me change my name to put a sock in it Sally and Joanne. As if.

        Like

    6. I have been a frequent visitor to the ED, usually sent by my own doctor. I have a multitude of diagnosis. I always bring a list of medications and diagnosis. I understand that their are other patients who may or may not be more critical than I. Being a disabled ICU/ER RN, I should be more tolerant, after reading this post I feel terrible. I need to be less hateful to the nurses and doctors. Every bed is usually full, I have also been a nursing supervisor- I know that they are over whelmed. I have been a very bad patient. I am always admitted to the hospital. My husband is a Paramedic Firefighter, my last visit I was brought in by my husband with grand mal seizures, the doctor came in and wrote orders but the nurse’s were so busy they didn’t get to me in a timely manner. I went into status epileptical seizures, at that time I was unconscious, my husband went out to the desk, spoke to the doctor and nurse, I was moved into the trauma room, paralyzed, intubated, IVS placed first, etc. Spent several days unconscious in ICU. Had the nurses followed the instructions given by the doctor I wouldn’t have needed the ICU. So my point is don’t form opinions about your patients, just because they had been there before. I’m willing to work together and be much more patient, if you are willing to treat me as a human and not a “drug addict.” I have a pain management physician who handles that part of my problems. I know that you are busy and that sometimes you don’t get a break. Together we can make it work. I’m glad this letter was written by this nurse. Thank you for caring for me, I’m sorry for my attitude. It will not happen again.

      Like

      1. Lisa.. your response to Ginger is spot on!! I work night shift and there are more mornings and sleepless days for me after a hard night than days of rest. More prayers for people, that I may never see again, and their families… I know it is not the same for patients diagnosed with an affliction. Having to suffer through whatever may be going on. But, as the original post suggests, we are humans as well. Just like “America”, we are flesh and blood creatures full of emotions. Which is why, like you said, we may not always come across as “warm”. It is SO difficult, at times, to maintain a “warm”, welcoming composure. That is part of what the original post is trying to say. No one is expecting special treatment or even a Thank You; just a little common courtesy from one human to another. No one can completely understand how an event has, or will, affect any individual. That’s part of what makes us all unique. We all have a story, called “Life”, and deal with things in our own way. But please don’t think that just because we are standing on the other side of the bed that we, or a loved one, have never been in a similar position. Because we ARE human, because we HAVE been in those positions, we do relate; and if we didn’t CARE we would never come back to work. No reasonable, especially an uncaring person, would willingly, voluntarily, keep returning to this job. Much love to all.

        Like

  2. That was so incredibly well written and so profound and spot on!
    I recently and reluctantly went to the ER because I was not in imminent danger of dying but was unable to get an appt with any orthopedics office. After waiting patiently for all tests to return the ER Physician entered the room and stated. There are 8 rooms with patients screaming with pain and Quite frankly you are the only one who should be screaming yet you sit here perfectly quiet. My fabulous nurse asked me why I did not complain more about the pain. My wonderful parents taught me to be tough, kind and until you get a diagnosis suck it up buttercup!! Thankful for the staff at Imperial Point medical center!

    Like

    1. Very well written. Unfortunately we live in a very insensitive society. There are some of us who have the utmost respect for the nursing profession.

      Like

  3. I appreciate that you do the job you’re being pain to do when I walk in the door. I don’t think that “nice” is part of your paycheck though….

    Like

      1. I have been a RN for 33 years, & I have seen much over my career, but this is truly a thankless job…..most of the time the patient never even knows who it is that has pulled them from thr grips of death whether it’s due to trauma,, the emergent need to get patient to the Cath lab, up to the O.R., the ICU, or even stabilize & send to a higher level of care. So even though we don’t expect a thank you….it still feels nice to have someone offer a simple thank you got everyone!!! Thank you Deanna McQuirter for speaking for the citizens of Southwest GA…Truth be know we would do it again because deep within us all there is an innate desire to help our fellow mankind!!! So with that being said….we’d all do it again..Thank you Deanna & to all the Citizens of Southwest GA….you are welcome…..we’d all do it over again!! God Bless & have a safe &
        fun filled summer.

        Like

    1. And you, my dear, dear Bill… You are part of the problem. You are the target audience for this post. And you are the reason a lot of of question our career choice on a daily basis. Thanks a you for proving the author’s point. Ass….

      Liked by 1 person

    2. That doesn’t give you or anyone else the right to treat these professionals in a sub par manner. You including “what you get paid to do” in your reply sets the tone for your anticipated behavior: demanding, no empathy, focus on yourself and looking at the staff as beneath you to bark orders at. I’ll tell you what “nice” gets you – classification as a decent human. “Nice” provides those working the ER with the little extra bump they may need to make it through their shift because they just witnessed a mother clinging to her deceased child begging someone to help when everything known to man was tried and it was just that person’s time to pass. Of course when you lack empathy and only think of yourself, “nice” is never going to make it to the table. You don’t care that these people work through their lunches, look up hours later and realize they’ve not even gone to the bathroom and also may be suffering as well (family problems, a sick child, etc). However, they’re there busting their asses to save yours and you don’t think being “nice” towards that person should be given a second thought because it’s their job. Your sense of entitlement makes me want to puke. Both of my oldest daughters are involved as health care professionals – 1 is a firefighter/paramedic and the other is an RN at an Emergency Room. My children do not get paid to take your crap. They get paid to do everything possible to save your life, stablize you, fix you, etc. So, if you walk in and are a dick to my child because your family failed in properly raising you to be a decent human being, they failed all the people around you. Your sort of behavior touches upon ever facet of your life and those who deal with you. Being “nice” is a remedial emotion that grows with us. It appears someone saw that emotion as a sign of weakness and stunted the growth of an emotion that when shared can help people make it through hard times. It’s not some touchy feely crap, it’s being a human being as opposed to a presumptuous and disrespectful jerk. Always remember that these people working in health care are someone else’s child, spouse, parent, friend, grand parent, etc. Would you appreciate one of your family members being treated that way? I know that as a Prosecutor I take charges very seriously when they involve an incident that arises from the ER. You can almost bet that it’s an entiled “patient” who was angry because they weren’t being treated fast enough and their nasty attitudes continued to the point of interferring with proper medical treatment of others in need. Those types of spectacles lead to Law Enforcement being called and in a lot of situations an ensuing Disordly Conduct charge being taken. All of a sudden your affliction as been removed from consideration at this establishment, but now our Jail Nurse will be more than happy to assist you and your pissy attitude when you are booked in. She’s accustomed to dealing with individuals who are not “nice,” so she can accommodate your desire to be ugly. As for the mother in me, I wish I could take on ever single person that comes into the ER that will be a problem for my child because of that mouth. She’s a grown woman and so professional with her job. She would smile and make you feel just as important as everyone else she’s treating even though you’re taking “nice” off the table. Sometimes one small smile or kind word makes all the difference in the world. Don’t ever take “nice” off the table. It’s a small thing that helps so many. As a Mom, when I hear how my child is treated, it yanks “nice” off the table and makes me want to know exactly how you justify being a dick besides “oh they get paid to do their job,” so that should somehow justify you being a prick. I have our health professionals backs and if by chance your behavior escalates to a charge, I hope to see you (and those that share your beliefs/actions) and your attitude in the near future. “Nice” doesn’t make a difference to me when I do my job, but it is a fact consideration in evaluating your case for prosecution. I look to everything you did from the moment you entered that ER until you were arrested. You wouldn’t believe the Disorderly Conduct charges that make their way to prosecution. The majority could have been stopped before they started if someone had just been “nice” – which is the simple courtesy these incredible people deserve.

      Like

      1. Jolene, Thank You for your comment! You expressed wonderfully what I feel. I am a Human Being that chose to be a Nurse. As a Human Being, I have a family and live a life like pretty much most of the general public. I was raised to treat everyone with respect, even when they’re not reciprocating. Nursing is natural for me, I can’t imagine doing anything else. Even on my worst days. All I wish for is to be treated like a person. Nothing more. Thank You again for your comments!!

        Like

    3. Interesting typo. I’m considering all the Freudian implications, and they are amusing. You, sir, are the ‘pain’, and I’m certain the nurses here are all hoping you don’t walk through their doors.

      Like

    4. I have spent months and yet more months in the hospitals and always tell them they are GOD’S angels on earth. Drs.wouldn’t be able to survive without them. Spend a few months in a coma and listen y them talk with out them knowing you can hear them and still they are so compassionate for you and pray for you. GOD made nurses because we all need our Mommies with

      Like

    5. Nice may not be part of our ‘paycheck’ but when you are on your death bed with no one by your side that’s when you’ll be wishing for a ‘nice’ nurse.

      But like others have said, you are what makes this profession so damn hard to be in. All you need is to be in one room doing CPR trying to literally get someone to come back and next door is an asshole complaining about having to draw a little blood or not being able to drink water. Don’t come if you don’t want to have to wait!

      Like

    6. I believe she was concerned because often there are patients with more acute conditions than yours……and it just might be that she would like you to be considerate of them. This has turned into a me first society…After going to college for 5 years in the mid 50s, I started a lengthy career as an RN…..in many different branches of the profession over the years. I was struck by the decrease in respect of administration for the RNs, LPNs, and CNAs, and what they were dealing with….Hospitals became too corporate,and with that administrators and many incoming patients seemed to forget the staff that is the backbone of the hospital….Nursing staff has to make split second decisions, and that might make YOU sit longer in the ER or wait a couple of minutes longer to have your light answered. Now, at the age of 85, I look at what nursing staff deals with, the conditions they work under, and they have nothing but my admiration. They go to work, not knowing if they will be able to leave 8 hours or 12 hours or maybe 16 hours later if needed….they cannot abandon patients..no matter what they had planned for time afterwork.
      Thank you all who remain in the profession…The RNs, LPNs, CNAs, and the PTs, OTs,social workers, housekeepers, maintenance people….all work for your health….

      Liked by 1 person

    7. Hey, Bill! Congratulations on setting the world record for for the best display of shitty character in the shortest amount of time! I mean, it was so minimalistic …quite brilliant, really. Bravo. Dare we ask what it is you do for a living? Let me fill you in. Resident PHYSICIANS make below an average middle class salary…and they don’t deal with a third of the bullshit nurses do. It’s not about the money, numbskull. And the post is not about doing or not doing a job based on anything. It’s about having some giddamn respect for your fellow human being. I’m sure you are the epitome of “THAT” guy…throwing a fit because you had to wait 3 minutes for something. Or that we won’t give you more sugar for your coffee when your diabetic and your blood glucose is 600. I am a medical provider committed to trying to keep my patients safe and healthy. I recently had a patient tell me to “fuck off” and threaten me because I told him he had to delay an elective surgery…because I happened to find something life threatening in my preoperative exam that had to be taken care of first. Had someone been less thorough this person would have died on the OR table without question. Just because you don’t feel well or something isn’t going your way isn’t an excuse anyone or anything else like garbage. Notice that our lovely author (and I use lovely genuinely, maybe my only lapse in sarcasm here) never said she doesn’t show up and treat every person she meets like her own family. Did she? So, Bill….how about we spend a little less time preaching about what others should be doing, shall we? And perhaps spend a little more time working on how NOT to be part of the entitled, unaccountable shitbag that so much of American society has become.

      Liked by 1 person

    8. Bill… they do not pay me enough, as an ER nurse, to be nice to pieces of shit like you. Nice isn’t a part of our paycheck? Well, nice isn’t included in your ER bill either, you fuck. I hope to Heaven & beyond that when your life is actually hanging in the hands of a nursing team, in the ER, they haven’t ever met you before because it’s always a shitty feeling when you have to have an inner fight with yourself about whether or not savings life is truly the best thing.

      Like

    9. Seriously dude? You’re nice to the folks at the grocery store, right? How about the plumber? Or the mailman, or your waitress? Is courtesy from you part of their paychecks? …. On second thought, your wording suggests to me that you’re probably not courteous to many people, and that’s a shame. The author’s not suggesting that people worship at the feet of ER nurses. Just requesting a little decency, respect and patience. Nurses do most of the hard work, especially in ERs. And I bet that even with your pathetic attitude, this nurse would still take care of you. Respect your nurse, sir.

      Liked by 1 person

    10. You don’t know how to proofread? she’s being “pain” to do it.
      Thank you for pointing out why she wrote the article.
      In medicine boy oh boy you better proofread or you’ve just screwed up somebody’s life and their health care.

      Like

  4. Yes I so agree! I’ve worked in ER as a phlebotomist and it surprises me at how many no.n emergency come through ER. It’s sad not to be able to bed someone that is really sick when it is full of non emergency patients.

    Like

  5. Thank you so much for all your help. You are all angels to put up with us when we are nice. God bless you! Even if we are cruel you help us with your knowledge and kindness. You soothe our familes and repair our damage. THANK YOU!

    Like

  6. Well, not sure this is actually that accurate, or at least not everywhere. I ended up at the emergency with my Mother in excruciating pain. Nobody paid attention to us for more than an hour. It was 1 in the morning, we were the only people in the waiting room and nobody else came while we were there. When they finally admitted her, the nurses took their sweet time, one of them barely opened her mouth so we had to ask her to repeat herself, you could tell she was irritated and probably woke up from her sleep. When the doctor finally came, my Mom was white and shaking, couldn’t talk but moaning from pain. He again couldn’t give us a bigger sign of indifference, he said he would give my Mom something for pain but it has to be approved by the pharmacy. It took two more hours until she finally got her injection. It was unacceptable! The ER was empty, I came out of my Mom’s room for 3 times to ask the nurse what was the hold up, there were at least 5 people around a table (including the doctor) laughing and not doing anything. The ER was empty, I could only see one young man in another room, and he was alone, no nurse around.
    I understand being busy and alert and sorting through serious, life-threatening cases, but sometimes it is just pure indifference and not doing your job. I tried to find out if waiting for a pain killer injection for 2 hours in an ER was the protocol, I was told by a lady in an administrative office upstairs that we were just treated inappropriately, as that should never happen.
    Yes, some patients have serious issues in ER, we know that, and I think nobody is absurd and expects to be treated as a priority when others need it more, but when you see a person convulsing from pain, and you are out there showing the cute doctor your new Apple watch and do not care doing anything, that is a bad image on this service. And honestly, it seems that this article was wrote to somehow justify and defend incompetence.

    Like

    1. Yeah^ and all cops are bad cops too right? Generalizing doesn’t make you any better than the crappy people who gave you that unacceptable experience.

      Like

      1. I agree that generalizing is unacceptable. Someone recently decided to make me the poster child of Big Pharm, the medical field, the “idiot” when dealing with addictions, etc… & saying America would be better off without me. There are abuses in all these areas but that is not ME. Then he pasted a small, accurate statement I posted on his website so that all his followers could hate me. The point I was trying to make was ignored and I was judged inaccurately and criticized for the random misspelling or typing error. It was unbelievable. I work in an ER and I completely agree with the original post of this column. On the other hand, I am reminded to not allow those who were selfish, disrespectful, and ungrateful to represent most of my patients and families. That would be generalizing, too.

        Like

    2. Nurses don’t sleep during their shifts. You must be confusing us with on-call doctors whose shifts run longer than 24 hours. Ours are a mere 13. We only get a bit of food (and if no one can cover for that, it’s the hospital’s fault, not ours) and, if our co-workers are nice, 5-10 minutes to cry or perform breathing exercises.

      We are NOT responsible for delays in getting responses/orders from doctors we have already called or paged, delays in the single pharmacy (for the entire hospital) approving a medication (especially a narcotic), or results that require a specialized education (beyond nursing) to be legally allowed to interpret.

      Also, please understand that in most hospitals, it is often the same doctors in the ED that have to respond to inpatient codes – and in many cases, the response team requires emergency nurses, ICU nurses, and nursing supervisors to leave their posts to attend an arrest (code) immediately.

      Hospitals also don’t pay staff to wait around – people get sent home or shuffled around if it’s “slow”. So there is almost never any more staff than absolutely essential to treat the patients in-house.

      Thank you for being so reasonable.

      Like

      1. Hahaha!! Nurses sleeping during shifts! Not saying that some do not sleep on shift, but that is SO NOT common practice. If there is a facility in the USA that allows napping during the shift, I need to apply! Lol. AND, things are not always what they seem! Just because you may think you’re the only patient in the department doesn’t mean you are! People think that ALL the time and it is simply not the case.

        Like

    3. If you are that unhappy with the service then go somewhere else. Understand that you do not know what you are talking about. I have been yelled at so many times by family and patients because I am “standing around doing nothing” at the moment you walked by. Or because I was rude and turned my back to you, but still listened. What you dont know is that I am standing outside at that moment because I am trying to rationalize why I just lost 4yr old no matter how heroic our efforts were and I turned my back to you because I still have her blood on my face and clothes. And then you complain to administration because “and all that nurse said was, I am sorry for your wait, I will check on your moms meds”.

      Like

  7. I think Americans need to be nicer in general, not just to emergency nurses. While I certainly appreciate the job you do my hope is to be appreciative of everyone’s job, I’ve seen workers at fast food restaraunts yelled at because there hamburger had ketchup on it. No one deserves to be treated like that, regardless of their degree, job title, perceived importance of their job. No one.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I don’t understand why so many patients clog up the ER with non emergencies. Do people not understand the Urgent Care and ER are totally different. I know some people understand because they have a copay of 10$ vs 250$. Others don’t pay for their insurance. I do think if they choose to go to ER for a cold or sinus problem they should however receive a bill since it was clearly not an emergency.

    Like

      1. With urgent care offices and 24 hr clinics popping up in every neighborhood there are plenty of places to go. Most of their parking lots sot empty most days too. We have had at least 6 such facilities open within 5 miles of us in the last 3 years. That does not include the clinics within the local CVS stores either.

        Like

      2. No, it’s not. If it’s after hours – waiting until the following day or later that week to see your own doctor IS an option when it’s a cold, runny nose, cough, stubbed toe, back pain.

        Like

      3. My hospital has in an urgent care, separate from the ER, in the same building. That doesn’t stop people from abusing the ER. Everyone assumes the ER is faster. Ha!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. oh and *Daniel* I never yelled at anyone. I always laughed that I was told it was the plucking of my eyebrow. I didn’t come in like the hospital is some sort of haven for Jesus and miracle healings, I came because my eye was swollen and I felt sick. You make all of these assumptions that are CLEARLY from *someone* who works in the ER as a nurse, talking g about not taking my meds – seriously? I needed no meds my entire life because all I did was run, do yoga and eat right with no medical issues. You don’t ask if i waited, you tell me I did? Nope, I didn’t wait, I just had no idea my bone was eroding and the second I did I went to a “large urban hospital” in Denver – good enough for you? I’m a smart woman, and I damn sure wouldn’t take your shit – and being in CO we might just run into each other one day, which i’ll enjoy 🙂

        Like

    1. Really sweetheart? Because my sinus infection eroded bone going to my brain and tore a hole in it. It took me so many visits to get someone to help and the pain felt like death. So maybe you should read up on the potential issues you don’t have knowledge about and many things of us *problems* won’t come bother you with issues you can’t classify as an emergency because rarely if ever does anyone in the ER solve a problem. Most nurses are kind but I’m more than knowledgeable about my condition and if i come in asking for help; and they don’t know how to help? It’s not put in the non-emergency pile of cases you label – you can call it the “i don’t know” pile.

      Like

      1. oh, and the nurses presumption while my brain was herniated? i must have plucked an eyebrow wrong. sometimes, you’re all just as irritating as we are, you just think you’re not. these days you can be a nurse in a few years making 80k so i get why nobody has heart anymore. nurses use to love their jobs and now they want money, the good one she are hard to find

        Like

      2. Hmmm…you must be in CA. My daughter is a nurse and it was a 4 year degree (just as it was for any ther Bachelor’s degree) . She, unfortunately, does not make $80k and she works very hard for her money! If she did make $80k she would deserve every cent of it. There is a nursing shortage in this country and you should know only a small percentage of nurses stay in their careers because the work is physically, mentally and emotionally demanding!

        Like

      3. I have lived in CA yes, but i’m actually in CO where the blog poster lives, and i know surgical nurses who make 100k, so yes it does happen often. CNA and other types change but just the other day a friend told me he dropped medical school because not he could go to a nursing program and come out as a TRAVELING NURSE (also like the post nurse) making better money with less loans. I’m not saying it’s everyone, but it was a career left to some, not everyone like it is now. This girl was a bartender for 5 years before being a nurse, went to school for a year for nursing! I looked. Secondly, I’m not talking about nurses who aren’t a part of this article. Your daughter may be a saint, but let’s not degrade everyone else’s life choices because it’s a hard job – so was working in architecture, architects don’t get pa d nearly as much and they work HARD, like so many they fields people like to forget about. If someone does their job and earns 80k whatever, but when she’s smiling about “catch me outside how bout dah?” — on her website, and in large letters bragging about people telling her that her hair is pretty before they coded…well, you may want to consider this for your own daughter, this will make life harder for the good ones. Being sick doesn’t make any of us passive or lacking knowledge – i’ve saved my own life begging nurses to just listen to me. Usually they’re kind, this nurse needs a reality check.

        Like

      4. Infections do not erode through bone over night. Things like this take time. So please, keep yelling at me and telling me how bad I am as an er nurse because after weeks of you not seeking care , your meds not helping, or complaining of chronic problems you are not rushed to the front of the line. ERs are NOT there to “solve your problems”. We are there to stablize you and get you to next step. Yes you only get a couple of days of pain meds. Follow up with your doctor or specialist, and find one if yours is busy. ERs will NOT SOLVE most of the problem that come in, it has been going on for weeks and you are mad I cant SOLVE it in the 1-6hrs you are here? (Ps go to a major urban hospital and wait 1-24hrs) But your ALIVE enough to complain about having to wait,,,,your welcome.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Oh Sara “I know more about what’s going on” – no you don’t bc if you really had a brain herniatiom you’d be dead. Once again I ask – did you live? Then the ER did their job competently.

        Like

      6. To the frustrated MD, it sounds like you need more compassion and education on brain herniation. My brainstem herniated it’s called a chiari malformation and I developed a syrinx. Still alive. I work as a nurse practitioner.

        Like

      7. This is a reply to note below from Sara….I have an MS and even as a nurse manager in a very busy section of the hospital, I made $60,000. I was responsible for 24 hour care, 40 staff and 26 patients…including patient and staff education. This was in New England. I do not know where your nurses are making 80,000 unless for 12 hour shifts ( worse decisionever made) or ina major city where the living expenses are outrageous.

        Like

      8. I was supposed to be dead, and for your information i’m now disabled because of it. did the ER find it? NO. eventually a pain doctor found it. AFTER i was in the ER with holes in my bone, which I don’t blame ANY nurse for, I had NO idea it was even happening and when i did i looked for a year and a half before they found my brain falling through my cribaform and with a torn dura in multiple places, infection in the cranium from the sinus. I should have been DEAD, and I continue to fight for my life and find the right surgeons – so thank you for your kindness. I do know a lot; I’ve lived through it, not blindly for the last 10 years. We are all capable of memorizing and research, observation of our own bodies – otherwise we are absurdly living expecting others to figure our lives out. I’m not giving that to just anyone. And FYI; i am extremely kind to my nurses until someone is rude or disrespectful- Jerk.

        Find me and i’ll show you photos of the disaster that came of medical care; it’s funny you think i’m lying yet when i come into the hospital i’m told i am very knowledgeable about my condition, and that it’s helpful. I know people dying right now who have to hospital hop and beg for help; and it’s not a disgrace to nurses it’s a sign of issues within the entire field. I have friends who are amazing at their jobs and I see others that come in w/ no compassion. In my opinion if you don’t have compassion you might not want to work in the field where people are suffering and dying with family grieving and stressed.

        Also, yes I do know many nurses that make extensive amounts of money and was just told me neighbor was going into be a traveling nurse because the money is great and loans are less than medical school (which he was in). i realize the rates vary – doesn’t take much to look up a nurses range of salary, i believe the avg. is around 67k with many factors of course. Research it.

        Also, ever wonder whose blood is in that photo being displayed for this fun blog? Because that’s really respectful, maybe someone’s trauma isn’t a showcase for your blog.

        Like

  9. I fell in the bathroom and had a concussion and bleeding on the brain. They worked hard to get me to the Trauma center! God bless everyone of the ER PERSONNEL THEY SAVED MY life my. Bain damage. I cannot thank them all enough. The

    Like

    1. Sara,
      I want to know where you are at. I have a Masters Degree in Nursing and I do not make close to 80,000. I am an ICU nurse that hold a persons hand as they leave this world (Often alone). I am the one who gets attack by an overdose patient and gets the hell beat out of me. I still don’t make 80,000. But then I went to nursing to take care of people not to make big money. Nurse go into nursing because of there heart not because of the money. I need the money to pay off the 130,000 in student loans I have because I have will soon finish my DNP !!!! Please walk in our shoes before you condemn us. Not all nurses ate the same but if they were setting around they were probably waiting on the medication order to come in, and the necessary charting has to be done to satisfy the government and protect the hospital when the sue.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ii wonder what is meant by “nice”? The nurse was not unctuous and falling all over you with platitudes? In the busyness of the shift, nurses need to get right to the point of what your problem is and just might not have time for small talk . I once had a medical student ask me why my school’s student nurses were ” so aloof…” he expected them to be flirtatious, to be kidding around…when they were very professional, and there to learn, not catch a man. Everyone has an opinion…

        In regard to salary…in some parts of the country salaries are higher than in others. I have known some nurses who went in to the 2 year AD programs because they could quickly get an education that resulted in a decent salary. Some of them went on to get BS and did well, others did well,but some were just plain miserable..never wanted to be a nurse but could go through a minimal program pretty quickly. One young man, who had majored in math in college, and was working as a mental health worker decided he would study nursing, ” because it is easy and I could do that..” he lasted 3 months,and left because ” it was too hard.” One of my grandsons while a student at a major NE university said the hardest working students on campus were the student nurses…When I graduated , 5 years and a BS,in 1954, I made $2080 a year at a highly respected research medical center. A male friend of mine got a business degree the same year and started at $5000/year. Just a point of interest at that time….it took years before nurses finally received compensation near what they deserved. ( I could have worked at a well known children’s hosp in the same city for $21 less/year.)

        Like

  10. I had diverticulitis with two perforations. I did not go to the ER. I scheduled an appointment with my doctor and he sent me for a CT scan. When the results came back he then called me and told me to go to the er so I ended up there in the end after all. I was really sick but I waited patiently until a doctor finally saw me and prescribed pain meds and admitted me. It makes me crazy when I hear about people going to the er for shoulder pain or a cold. It should be reserved for life and death situations.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Well you certainly stirred a hornets’ nest with this post!

    I certainly appreciate the stress of an ER nurse, and the all too common rude behavior of a significant segment of our American population. Unfortunately, to the detriment of the caring medical industry staff, the medical system (and staff who no longer give a sh*t) has done and continues to do its share to frustrate the ‘captive consumer’.

    I bring this up only to point out that many of us are frustrated with medical administrative procedure and being treated as if we do not have a vote in the treatment we are provided.

    This situation is in crisis mode and must be dealt with if there is any hope that the general populace will more commonly treat medical staff with respect.

    Like

    1. Thank you sir for recognizing the real problem with our healthcare industry. I too am a nurse and although I don’t work in the ER, I fell the grind of being a cog in a broken system. Many times I see patients that don’t get their needs met through our current healtcare system and most times, it is not the nurse’s fault. Many times, its the insurance you have that will not allow for a procedure to be performed or they will not pay the cost of an expensive medication. There are times when the out of pocket expense is more than you can give or you haven’t met your deductible and then you end up in the ER as a last ditch effort to get treatment. And when you get to the ER, you are frustrated by the previous items mentioned above and then you have to wait for what seems like forever. It is a never ending broken system and everybody is mad on both sides. My hope is that it doesn’t disintegrate because there is nothing to take its place and that would be even worse.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I had to wait due to other patients came before me even thou I was in pain I understood there’s ppl came in first I finally got waited on and the nurses I had were very nice to me and cared a lot so all you nurses do a great job my dr told me to go to the emergency room and my ins wouldn’t cover the urgent cares near me

    Like

  13. I have learned how blessed we are with our medical system after living in Guatemala and taking women tonthe hospital there. They would wait 8 to 10 hours to see a doctor and they were so grateful. We want instant everything. It is awful. Thank you for what you do!

    Like

  14. I too am a nurse and I understand both sides of this story. One as a patient you do see some staff doing things the wrong way. I think as “America ” we have realize that, there are patients who come to the ER for the wrong reasons. On the other side they feel like they are endangered, scared and don’t know better, that cold makes them feel like they can’t breathe and they don’t know what else to do. We are to educate the people as well. I also know that some come to the ER because they have no other options for any treatment from lack of insurance. The Emergancy Department can not turn you away like a clinic can. If you want to truly discuss this topic you must look at it from all points of view not just as the good ER nurse. Every nurse knows of the one bad apple that does give the bad impression. Every nurse knows about the nurse that gives their all and gets no recognition. To be honest as a ER nurse this is not a surprise, it is discussed in nursing school when you discuss which field you will be entering the pro’s or Con’s are told to you.

    Like

    1. As in any area of life, there are people who would be better working in a different field…It is unfortunate when a person who never wanted to become a nurse ( and there are some) and hates it continues to work in the profession.

      Like

  15. What people don’t realize is healthcare is a customer service business….. whether you think so or not, we have many such things as “satisfaction surveys”, SCIP protocols, sentinel event documenting and it’s only gotten worse….. they expect more from nurses, more charting, more patients seen in the same time, more staffing shortage, higher patient acuity, yet with all this and reimbursements from Medicare and Medicaid going down……. people think it’s some glorious job….. it’s not….. behind the scenes it’s not easy…… working 12 hours shifts….. maybe……. which means 12 hours, plus the extra hour for free for report and such…… everyone knows not every person is the same personality wise and I feel sorry for patients who have a bad experience….. but for every one of those…… nurses get 10 fold…… it’s like servers getting crapped on because they aren’t fast enough, when in reality there are many more people involved…… one bad patient can take away 2,3,4 nurses not to mention doctors and techs….. pain sucks, it is a symptom, but pain isn’t the thing that kills (well extremely rarely) but a stroke not seen fast enough kills faster, a
    Ruptured AAA, definitely will kill before I finish this sentence, a heart attack not seen ASAP might end up on chronic medicines for heart failure and have defibrillators and pacemakers put in if not seen fast enough…. a perforated bowel going septic can cause organ failure if not taken to surgery……. HELL look what happened recently in Illinois…… 2 convicts somehow were let out of their restraints and held hostages and raped a nurse…… so please realize that it might seem slow to you…… go to other countries where it takes months to be seen sometimes for things that should have been seen much sooner. Patients are patients, nurses are
    Nurses, we are all human beings and if you show me courtesy and patience I always try my best to help ASAP….. think about it….. do servers at restaurants like going above and beyond for rude people? I’m not saying it’s right to deny care, but it definitely puts a strain on patient/nurse relationship…. and for the nurses…….. put yourself in their shoes too…… I’ve been in both and it isn’t hard to use the golden rule on both ends

    Like

    1. Kirk, in response to your comment. I don’t think people realize the amount of staff required to deal with a high acuity patient and how devastating it can be for the department (Especially smaller EDs, I’ve worked in large and small departments) to recover. It can take hours. One patient, be they medical or psych, can tie up to 4 or 5 nurses. That’s not including ancillary staff and at least 1 doc. (Which may be the only doc for the department.) I also don’t think they realize the dangerous situations that occur and what we do to keep EVERYONE safe. ERs have, unfortunately, become a dumping ground for mentally unstable people. And so after you “stabilize” the psych, or even just some drunk/high jackass, patient that has just beat the crap (mentally and/or physically) out of you and everyone else in the room, you enter the room of someone chomping at the bit because now they’ve had to wait for hours… Let me just say, I absolutely get where you’re coming from. It is hard to remain overly courteous for the remainder of your shift. I wish Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement took that in to account lol. The ER can be a dangerous place but I guess we are doing our jobs since people just don’t realize who might be in room next to them. (Of course they would probably just complain about all the noise and commotion they hear throughout the department. Yay HCAHPS!)

      Like

  16. Was treated at an ER for kidney stones at 12midnight and got very good service. Everything was handled very professionally and I was treated w/ respect by the doctor, nurse & CT tech. Only complaint was loud laughing in hallways from workers getting done w/ their shift—not the place for this.

    Like

  17. Um . . . Wow? As a retired Social Worker turned Substitute Teacher for the past 11 years, who suffered with severe asthma since birth, averaged 3 hospital stays per year, now has Stage 2 COPD, has “Coded,” 3 times in my life (twice receiving the Catholic Sacrament of Last Rites), and is grateful for every breath, all I can say is, wow. Everything you feel is valid, and you are brace to face it and share it. However, I think you may need a break and you probably need it now. If you show up at work each day feeling an iota of what you have shared here, then you really need to take a break for a while. Please consider it and take care.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I worked in an E.R. years ago. Had people brought in by emergency squads for splinters, couldn’t pay for a taxi, and their family couldn’t stand the person’s body odor to drive them for a prescription refill. I had young men complaining of severe back pains only to find out they were having a heart attack while others just wanted a note to stay home from work. I’ve had patients with gut pain with appendicitis, are instructed (their family too) not to eat so they can have surgery and their family brings them burgers to eat prolonging their surgery. I have had people asking for warm blankets during codes and get mad at us lazy people for not bringing it rught away. I told one daughter I will tell the tech while running for medications during the code and she reported me for ignoring her. She saw the code come in, hung out in the hallway, didn’t care about the person just wanted a blanket. I have had to stop whatever i was doing to bring family members foid because they were starving after waiting 2 hours. I have gone without using a bathroom, eating, or sitting for 13+ hours straight. Yes there were nights that weren’t hectic but when squads are piling in and we are trying to make room for those people we do not have time to consider those nights.
    I have heard my friends complain about their office, waitressing, cashier, etc jobs and can relate. They cannot. I am a nurse, consoler, waitress, philosopher, teacher, bandaid applier, hugger, listener, psychologist, manager, defuser, referee, protector, life saver, and many more in just 13 hours.
    I left exhausted while loving and hating my profession at the same time. I wept for the loss of a person I have seen for years coming to us and succumbed to their illnesses and diseases with me holding their hand while their family is arguing who will get what now that this person lying there is dead. I have laughed with young, old, and in between. I had to stop a father from beating his 15 yr old daughter when her belly ache was pregnancy. I obtained urine samples from drunks and drug adducts from squeezing out my pants after they peed on me. The stories go on.
    I do love what I do most of the time. I have the right, like anyone else, to see the good and bad in it. I also see regulations from the State, Joint Commission, Press Ganey, Medicare, Federal, and whatever else strangulates us and how we provide care. I have seen good and bad medical staff. Those that gave all and those that didn’t give a damn.
    I have been on all sides of the stretcher. The nurse, the patient, and the family frightened for my loved one. For someone to say to get a different job is futile. I am a caregiver in my heart. There would be no nurses anymore. Perhaps we should be like some countries and the family stays and cares for the patient until they are discharged. This would lesson the attitude on both sides.
    Would you clean your parent after they peed or defecated? I did for both of my parents when they became ill, I straight cathed my Father so he could pee. I was the one who cared for my Father when he was dying. I cared for my Mother while she was dying from cancer. I have siblings but they felt I was experienced since I was a Nurse. Please never judge another person. You do not know what is going on in their lives while caring for yours.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I too cared for my daddy in his last days. We found he had cancer, very advanced, on my birthday April 14th 2007. They immediately ported him in anticipation of chemo. When I saw the scans of his liver and that it looked like Swiss cheese, I was the one to ask quality or quantity dad? It’s only a matter of time… He chose quality. My sibs all rallied in to help with the emotional aspect while I took to everything else. May 17th 2007 we all sat with him while he took his last breath.
      I also cared for my grandma in 2013. I felt honored to be a nurse and have the knowledge to care for those that rises and cared for me and made sure to raise me well enough to push me I to a career that would last and that I was good at.
      Now, I’m the patient & have to rely on strangers. Some are great and treat me well, others not so much. I always keep in the back of my mind, that tjey have umpteen other pts they see in a day and maybe have had a loss or emergent situation that is on their mind.

      Like

  19. Nurses are rock stars. The best people are nurses. My mother, the strongest and kindest woman I know is a nurse. I am unfortunately intimately aquainted with the ER as a caretaker advocating for my father, who was a cantankerous Vietnam veteran with ptsd, dementia, kidney failure, heart disease and anxiety. I have also been to the ER several times as a patient with complications from lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. And I have, more often than not, had tremendous care. I have a good understanding of the way things work because of my unique trifecta of practical nursing knowledge from long talks with my mother, caretaker knowledge from being the primary for my dad and my own patient experience. So I do not say any of this lightly. I will take a good nurse over a good doctor for almost anything. Barring complicated surgery, good nurses make the best of a bad day in my life. On the other hand, a bad nurse can make a bad day one the worst days you’ve ever experienced. I blame a healthcare system that forces poor people to use the ER like a primary care physician for the long wait. I know you’re working your butts off. I know that 7 out of 10 patients are assholes to you and sometimes it is hard to hold the smile or at least a neutral face on the worst days. I know it’s ridiculous policies that keep some hospitals from diverting even when there’s gurneys in the hallway waiting hours for open beds. I do my best to say thank you even when it’s hard for me to speak because I know you don’t hear it enough. But yes, I really do need a child catheter. Please don’t roll your eyes or insist that I am wrong. I prefer not to experience even more excruciating pain and pee blood for a few days after you insist on shoving an adult catheter where it doesn’t want to fit. And all the while you’re telling me that it doesn’t hurt. Um whose fanny is in the air? Mine. So let’s trust that I am not pretending. Just so you know, I have had more pleasurable spinal taps. And if I say my pain is a 7. It’s really a 7. I consider puking from the pain or absolutely zero sleep the benchmark for 7. I have been dealing with severe pain for years. I have absolutely no interest in getting high. I just have been puking up my oral meds for the last 3 days from a random stomach bug and now my bp has been high for too long because my pain is out of control. So I am reluctantly going to the ER despite my fears of being treated like, or more detrimentally charted as, a drug seeker. This is why I bring my oral meds, my dr information and usually my mother with me. I also bring my blanket, pillow, puke shield headband that doubles as an eyemask and headphones. Please don’t make fun of me for doing this. It’s not fun to be in so much pain and anxious. Those chairs in the waiting room are torture, the lights are too bright and my sensory overload threshold is roughly zero because of the intense pain and lack of sleep. These tools allow me to patiently wait while my tests are run and meds ordered. I promise I am already aware that I don’t pack light. No. I’m not moving in. Please just let me curl up with my audiobooks to distract myself from this reality. I need to be at Hogwarts right now. So please don’t make me feel like a burden because I didn’t hear your question. As soon as I am aware, I rip the earbud out. The best nurses gently tap my shoulder and smile kindly while I remove the mask and earbuds. Those are my favorite.

    I am so sorry that America is generally assholes to you guys. Because I am sure that it was not the intentions of those rare nurses to make my bad day worse. I know that they are human beings who probably had off days because of all the mean people that came before me. So I still say thank you. Even to the catheter nurse. I can’t imagine the strength it takes to be a nurse. I barely have enough to be a patient.

    Like

  20. Wow all these long post ur all wasteing time. Get back to life we are all humans and we’re all different. Thanks for ur service

    Like

    1. Alan, so you would tell your kids or significant other that to express their feelings, their frustrations = a waste of time? You are really a person lacking compassion???? Debriefing, venting..healthy for the most part. Instead of an in person group, this is a group on the internet….give the a break. Why then are you even reading it???

      Like

  21. I wish the picture at the top which goes with the post were not as bloody as it is I would like to share this but I won’t put that sort of thing on my newsfeed.
    If you have a version without the graphic photo please let me know I would love to share it.
    I have had various trips to the ER room none of them as a critical patient thankfully. I had a doctor call me a wimp because the x-ray tech went to see if he really needed one of the x-rays he order because I was just about crying with pain. Thing was when she came back I asked her to tell me where she wanted it positioned and positioned it myself until she was satisfied with the positioning. This ended up pretty pain free for me as I was able to move my arm slowly and take better care because I knew where it was hurting etc. MY elbow was broken but I got through it though I have to admit I was tempted to hit the doctor.
    When I went in for problems with my gallbladder I had a nurse attempt giving me an IV 5 times. I didn’t yell or berate her However I did question why I was charged for each of those attempts when I was not the reason the process was stopped.
    As someone else stated I too would rather see a good Nurse or Medical assistant rather than a bad doctor any day.

    Like

  22. The heros of the hospital. You can always count on a nurse at the hospital. They are there for you and with you when things are not so good. The nurse that was there in my dad’s last days was so compassionate and caring. My mom’s last trip to the hospital the nurse we knew was standing the with tears in her eye’s. Her dialysis nurse came to the house before she passed just to tell us how much she cared for mom and us with tears in her eyes. In my book the nurse’s don’t get the thanks that they deserve for everyone they care for.
    From the bottom of my heart thank you taking care of my family as well as you do.

    Like

  23. Thank you for writing this as it is an eye opener. My last experience in the ER, I was there for 5 hours, never saw a doctor and ended up leaving. The following day I went to another hospital and ended up being admitted. Our health system is broken, the way ER patients get triaged needs to be changed – and I wish I could offer up a solution that would benefit everyone. Thank you for all you do.

    Like

  24. System. Not the nurse’s fault. Not patient fault either. Hire more people to serve the client better. My $150 a month means I get seen on my terms.
    Triage makes sense to me and people should be nice on both sides. People should smile and be nice when they are being paid to do a job. Pay should be higher. Vacations should be longer.

    Like

  25. I was married to an ER nurse for a number of years so I know that the description is accurate. But honestly, by the time I finished reading the piece, it just sounded like whining.

    Here’s the deal. When somebody decides that a trip to the ER is probably prudent, you’re right, they’re in pain. and they’re scared, and they’re wondering how they’re going to pay for this, and now they’re frustrated because they’ve been waiting for 2 hours and 40 minutes, and guess what? You’re handy. So you’re the one they’re going to unload on. They’re not worried about what Emily Post would do.

    Get over it. It comes with the territory. That’s part of what you’re there for. When they see the MD they’ve already vented and they can listen to what’s being said to them with a semi-rational mind. They just didn’t highlight this aspect of your job in nursing school.

    My ex would get home from work and unload on me for 30 or 40 minutes. I got used to it. I got over it. It was part of what I was there for

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “WAS married?” Understood. I should stop there. (Unless, of course, she died… in which case, forgive my sarcasm.)

      Perhaps this was not the most articulately written article in the sense that just because this nurse is venting about her not- so -positive experiences doesn’t mean she neglects to show up to work every day and treat everyone she meets from a convicted rapist to a congressman with the same compassion she would one of her own loved ones.

      Again, (I’m really starting to feel badly for this dead horse…) this comes down to human to human interaction. It’s not a pissing contest or plea for martyrdom.

      “My job is hard too! Suck it up!” Get over yourself. There are a whole hell of a lot more mindless and purposeless things these people could be doing for better money, less physical and emotional stress and way fewer hoops to jump through to get there. Our society is entitled and unaccountable for their actions, especially regarding their health and that should not be sugarcoated. If you think just because you are not feeling well or things aren’t going the way you planned there is an excuse to act like an angry toddler… Or that a subspecies of human exisist that should just lay down and take your unnecessary bullshit (repeatedly and without reprieve), then congrats on being lumped in with the aforementioned shitbag population of our society. P.s. they did teach it in school. It’s called “setting limits.” I’ll tell you that only works for some.

      Treating another person, especially someone whom you have never met before (and 999 out of 1000 times is genuinely there to help) like garbage just because you feel like it and you feel “that’s part of their job” is pathetic and I am embarrassed to share a species with you. You can cuss and scream all you please if your in pain…or I have to do something that maybe be uncomfortable in order to take care of you properly, but just don’t make it personal. I did not shoot you. I did not have a few too many drive your car into a tree. I am not starving your adult fully functioning son or not doing my job by not spoon feeding him his dinner when he is withdrawing from drugs and really just needs to rest. I did not do any of these things to you but I will do my best to help you fix them without judgement.

      I worked as a bedside nurse in an ICU at a busy trauma center. There are multiple studies that show staff in these settings suffer from PTSD symptoms similar* to vetarans. (Please note I said similar, not equivalent- before someone jumps down my throat. Also, science, FTW!) Here’s an idea. Why don’t you go run about 4-5 miles, then put somebody in a body bag (who you just spent a good part of the last two months with, reassuring both them and their family every day. You really thought they had turned a corner.) THEN, go be apologetic to a patient’s wife who demanded her husband have his soup microwaved 10 minutes ago and tells you “you better hurry” (Not kidding.) That behavior is unacceptable in any setting. Ever. But it’s my job, right? “Get over it, you’re getting paid the big bucks to do this” Fun fact: the average salary of resident PHYSICIANS is less than the average annual middle class salary. So, again….the hoop jumping to financial gains ratio is a little uneven to make that argument. Please spare me. ‘Investment’ in this industry extends way beyond the green stuff, I can promise you. Back to this guy: I probably sound like your ex, right? I digress…

      “This was your choice and other professions work just as hard. If you want to complain, do something else!” (Shout out to that architect in some earlier post!) I prefer “PSA” over “complaining, ” And as if it were that easy…to leave behind the time, skills you took years to master, the stories, the colleagues…. However, Don’t think the assumed serventry and some visuals that will haunt me for the rest of my life, as well as the newfound anxiousness; cautiousness surrounding things I’ve never worried about before because of some of the most cruel and heinous shit I will probably ever see….would stop some of us from perservering.

      I am now a medical provider and while I have found that no longer being on the frontlines pe Dr is a bit less daunting at times, the uncouth persists. I recently had a critical finding on a preoperative exam . This finding was silent, but life threating…and I gently told the patient we would have to delay the upcoming elective surgery until we took care of the other problem. Had this person gone to surgery, they would have died right on the table without question. As I sat with the patient talking with him about the next steps with a warm sense of purpose and pride in my work for undoubtedly saving this patient’s life, the patient proceeded to tell me to “fuck off”, threaten me, and that “we should have known about this earlier.” Granted, the patient had failed to show for their appointments three times prior to this and then complained when we could not squeeze him in at the specific time he chose. Seems like a totally appropriate response given the situation… (proverbial eye roll). I stood up and calmly replied, “Iet me give you a few minutes to breathe and call your wife and I’ll be back to help you,” unsurprised and unphased.

      I love my patients. I love talking with them, teaching and forming a partnership to empower people to take control of their health. However, I witness countless anecdotes similar to mine more than they should ever occur anywhere and it needs to stop. Laws regarding assault against healthcare workers is an isolated Bill for a reason. It’s a problem and we have just let it go as “part of our jobs” for too long.

      So the moral is, my friends (after a much longer rant than I had planned; I feel so liberated!) Human beings are freaking human beings. We should be trying best to mutually respect each other in all scenarios. Of course there will be the occasional slip up natural to the human condition, but you don’t get a hall pass just because you’re sick. We aren’t asking you to kiss our asses or tell us we have the hardest job in the world. Just maybe try not to be a dick to your fellow human. We’ve got a little baggage ourselves.

      Like

      1. rDub… Like you, I digress. But you nailed it! I am a human being just like my patients and their families. Like you said, I’m not asking anyone to kiss my ass, just looking for people to see me as a fellow human being! Thank You!

        Like

    2. I guess you never worked the abysmal 12-13 hour shifts a lot of hospitals implemented….not making use of the research that shows an increase in errors if nurses work more than 8. Sometimes the 12 hours morphs into 16… It is not whining, it is desperation at having to cut corners, and work short staffed so the 3 piece suiters ( of which there should be fewer)in administration can show how economically efficient they are.

      Like

  26. I find that just a quick word of explanation to the patient can head off a lot of brooding and misunderstanding and instead generate understanding on their part.

    Like

  27. I wish I had a choice every time I’m brought in by EMS to the ER. Unfortunately, I’m not given the option to stay home. I have NCS among other health issues. If I pass out and hit my head, have a scissors stuck in my abdomen, a knife in my leg, a knife stuck in my throat, falls down 14 stairs. All to find out an artery has not been hit. I get stitches a CT and I’m on my way home. I feel guilty asking for water because I can’t swallow. A basin if I’m going to vomit. I know how busy it is. I leave with the feeling of guilt, I could have pulled whatever I’ve been stuck with on that day, and take my chances. From an X nurse to patient (I’m a liability now) I would prefer to do what I can from home. NOT every patient who occupies a bed wishes to be there…. if I leave it’s AMA…. my insurance doesn’t pay for that…. catch 22.

    Like

  28. I’m a nurse. I work in critical care and ICU. Most of the time, I have 2 jobs. Sometimes 3. I’ve also been a patient and a family member. As I read the comments, I’m thinking of my experiences, and I understand the frustration – on all sides. The system is broken. Money rules healthcare now – CARE used to. It’s just the way it is. There was a time when we could truly practice the ART of nursing. Those days are gone, but nurses still long for them, and wish we had the opportunity to do what we used to be able to do. Generally, we do everything we CAN, depending upon the limitations of the system. (Yes, I know there are some bad nurses – I have fired some of them). With the endless field of comments, I feel compelled to share some thoughts… I was scheduled to work “3 twelves” (three, twelve-hour shifts in a week). On Monday, we had our “usual” patient – a frequent flyer. She was a retired nurse, with a narcotic addiction and failing health who would find unusual ways to hurt herself, so that we could “rescue” her (a form of munchausen’s). She was always demanding and needy – a patient who took a lot of time and resources to care for. Yes, there were nurses who verbalized their distaste for her. Others understood her illness, and made it a goal to “beat her to the call light”, by stopping by to check on her going, and coming from every pass by her room – but all of us treated her injury-of-the-week with skill and precision, since her injuries were typically significant. This time, she had ripped out her trach, but had underestimated the trauma to her body when she did this (she had done this a number of times before). First responders had tried, unsuccessfully to re-secure her airway. She trusted us (her regular team) to save her, but we couldn’t save her this time. Her ability to sabotage her own health outweighed our ability to save her this time. We were left feeling like we had failed her. Logically, we knew she had done this to herself, but (as odd as it may sound), we had grown attached to her grumpy, cursing, thankless, pitiful existence. Perhaps, it was because she presented unusual challenges for us – and she always needed to be saved. And so, as we sent her body to the morgue, knowing that there was not a next-of-kin to notify, we gathered for a moment in a “quiet room” (typically used for families who have lost a loved one), hugged, wiped a few tears, sang a verse from some stupid song, and went back to work… The next shift brought a new set of challenges. As I rushed by a patient’s room and was stopped by their family member (complaining about waiting to be discharged), I actually told them , “Trust me, you don’t want to be first in line right now.” When I hurried away, I knew they were upset with me, but I couldn’t stop. While they waited, I had received report on a med flight arriving. It might have appeared to the family that we were “standing around”, because for 3 or 4 minutes, we were poised and waiting quietly confirming who-would-do-what -sometimes there’s laughter while we wait (I don’t remember if there was that day). The 16 year old girl had been thrown from the vehicle. She was in really bad shape. When she arrived, we figured out that they had her name wrong at the scene. We quickly realized she was the daughter of one of US… We all knew this kid. You cannot IMAGINE the intensity of this situation. She was a smart, athletic, girl who was well-behaved. We had watched her grow up since she was in elementary school. But now, her perfect, young, muscular, athletic body was covered with a blood-mixed-with-gravel, grass, and dirt combination. Her bones were protruding from her limbs. Her long blonde hair was dripping with blood. She was unresponsive, and needed support for breathing. When we transferred her to the gurney, someone supporting her head during the transfer realized she was missing part of her skull. Her brain was exposed. It was physically and emotionally grueling to do our jobs, but we did. It took the entire team to take care of her (and the other two critical patients who arrived minutes apart). When I returned to the discharging patient, I didn’t tell them what had happened, because I couldn’t. We can’t tell you. I didn’t apologize, but I calmly told them that an emergency had taken me away, and mentioned again, “you REALLY did not want to be first in line”. With every ounce of professionalism I had, I turned my attention totally. I focused on the patient’s discharge needs (which were significant). I provided the necessary teaching, follow up instructions, as well as some supplies. I answered a handful of questions, and called for a wheelchair. It was then, that they ALL unloaded on me. It seems that they had seen me, “standing there talking” for “long enough for them to be discharged”. I had wasted their time, someone’s kid didn’t get picked up from daycare, and none of them had eaten (nor had I). I let them blow off steam, as it peeled away the inside layer of my throat and gut, and caused an ache in my chest. I coughed and took in a huge breath (it helps – to stop you from going-into-a cry) before wishing them all good health, and reminding them to wear their seatbelts on the way home (because seatbelts save lives). That was Thursday….. Two days prior (on Tuesday), my dad had a heart attack. He followed all of the training that I had given him. He called 911, took an aspirin (chewed it up), and waited quietly until the paramedics arrived. (Mother called me while they were waiting). I handed off my patients, clocked out and met my dad’s ambulance at the door. My dad was nervous, and cracked a few lame jokes with his nurse. She didn’t laugh. Mother tried to break-the-ice, by asking the nurse questions about herself, starting with the standard, “how long have you worked here?” and “Do you know my daughter?” My dad’s nurse was serious and to the point, not deviating from her tasks and gathering information that was critical to my dad’s condition. My parents didn’t understand, but I did – I was watching his rhythm changing. She was saving his life without him knowing it, and prepping him for the next step. He went straight to the cath lab and surgery. Afterward, my parents told me they really didn’t like that nurse very much. “She wasn’t very friendly”. I decided to let them see for themselves…On the day my dad was discharged, I arranged for him to see the nurse who kept him alive until his vessels were repaired. She was thrilled to see him doing so well – and especially so, because he had such significant blockages. She told him she had been checking on him. She said she knew he would do well, so he could tell more of those corny jokes to his grandkids! When we left, my parents were so surprised that she had “a personality”. Now, they really liked her. I smiled, and said, “Dad, personality doesn’t save lives, skill does”. You needed her skill when you came in. She had a job to do, and she did it. Then, they got it. Without me pointing it out, I’m not sure they would have ever understood, and that’s my own parents!…. Noting that there were many other situations and patients that week, America, this is A Week in the Life of a Nurse. This is real. How has your work-week gone? …. think about it. (PS. The 16 year old LIVED and appears completely normal today, which is WHY we do what we do).

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Thanks to all the nurses in the world. It is amazing to me that you all don’t run away when the personal toileting class is even mentioned let alone taken. Talk about putting up with a bunch of $hi+ 😝
    In all seriousness though i hope that universal healthcare coverage is a reality soon . That would get some the non life threatening cases into the PCP and out of the ED’s.
    Thank you all again 💜

    Like

  30. I have nothing but profound respect for ER nurses and all nurses in general. On the night my mother took sick and died, a ER nurse gently took me by the hand and led me toward a waiting area and away from the place they were working on my mom, ’cause all I was able to do was pace back and forth. I thank them for that for the rest of my life. Some things you just don’t forget.

    Like

  31. My father in law spent time in an out of state hospital. He had heart surgery with a specialist specific to his medical issue. The nursing staff was wonderful. But I could see how overworked they were. My father in law did yell at a nurse, and tho they were VERY short staffed, he had a legitimate reason to be upset. I was able to smooth it over for both of them, because i was there 24/7 as his advocate. I can say I felt so bad for the nurse and so bad for my father in law. Nurses have a tough job!! I always try to be considerate and kind, no matter where I encounter a nurse. I can see that all these hospitals and health care facilities continue to put more and more of a burden on already overworked nurses. I have to say thank you to all of the nurses pouring your hear an soul into your jobs!! God Bless You All!!

    Like

  32. As a previous pediatric nurse I completely understand this and can definitely say no one wants to be first. I have had my own fair share of visits to the ED–either for myself, my children or other family members and I have to say…I’ve have both good and bad visits depending on the hospital. I’ve been to one hospital where I was seen and released rather quickly and I’ve been to a different hospital where I’ve had to wait over 5 hours to be seen. In some instances, it was flu and strep season and other times it was bad weather and a lot of accidents. I’ve been to other hospitals where I was basically the other one in the waiting area and I still had to wait for hours and I’ve witnessed nurses just standing around chatting and drinking coffee instead of doing their job. I’ve been charged a hefty hospital fee for sitting in a chair and never seen by a doctor and another time my insurance covered the whole visit. The hospital is the very last place anyone should want to be–it’s the place where you go when you’re so sick it can’t wait until the doctor’s office opens the next day however, I’ve witnessed drug addicts fake illness to receive medication and I’ve seen a parent arrested for causing illness upon her baby just so the mother could get drugs. I’ve seen babies born addicted to drugs and shaking so badly I had to look away and calm myself down. I’ve had babies pass away in my arms and I’ve held mother’s in my arms to comfort them.
    Being a nurse has its perks however; witnessing a true miracle, seeing a birth and the tearful smiles on the parents face(S). I commend you nurses and thank you for your hard work and devotion to the patients.

    Like

  33. Nurse Magenta:
    Reading through this blog, my goodness! None of it surprises me, but dayum!…
    I almost wish there was a way to offer comfort, or be a sounding board, or someone you all could ask at a hot minute for prayer…
    But I hope you take away from this that most of us really do appreciate what you do. I have friends who are nurses and guess what?! You’re normal! Well, at least in most things – you DID choose to be a nurse – what’s wrong with you???
    You’re like the opposite of the Grinch – your heart is too big, so you have to give most of it away…
    Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Exhausted emergency nurse. That was beautifully expressed. I’ve been an ER nurse for fifteen years and been doing critical care transports for another twelve. It never gets easier. Some people say thank you. Some say not so nice things, (a euphemism). But we keep doing it because love people and we love helping people in distress. I’m glad you put into words what we all are thinking. I wish every ER patient could read that passage before registering.

    Like

    1. I never expected a patient to say thank you. My position w s to take care of them…they are in a crisis mode and very likely saying thank you is way down on their list of things to do. A person does not have to say thank you to be respectful…it is the rude complaint from possibly an unreasonable person or relative that gets us. Over the years, though, I have had many relatives thank me, and then when patients were being discharged, they usually gave thanks to the staff. It is tough, when you are running your legs off, and keeping your brain working so that you do not make a mistake, and keeping administration happy, working short staffed, getting new patients…then to have someone gripe at you. I was debriefing a small group of staff after a severe crisis one day in a conference room that had glass in the door. A visitor was standing in the corridor. I had the staff get something to drink while I spoke with them. When we walked out to get back to work, the visitor yelled at us that we were more interested in our breaks and drinks than in taking care of patients or speaking to him. Fortunately a physician came along and told him what was happening..

      Like

  35. Dear emergency team.
    No one forced you to become a nurse. It was your dream to help people. Knowing full well whats involved. People arent there out of free will. They are there because they need medical help. They are scared and in pain. If this job is too much for you that you need to go online to complain..go find yourself another job and leave this job to someone who can handle it…

    Like

    1. No, no one forced her to become a nurse,however you enter the profession after having been taught the right way, the professional way…and then in a lot of situations you are in a hospital run by non-nurses, and maybe a unit that is managed by a non-nurse..and in a situation where no one is standing up for nurses. One little error, ( and I am not talking medication or anything life-threatening), and a nurse has to go through hell to prove her/himself. Hospitals have too many people at the top…too many executives who do not have a clue what actual patient care involves. The non-nurse executives who might be VPs over units seem to be in competition regarding which one can save the most money….The winners win because they did not hire sufficient staff…would not hire sufficient staff…and result in overworking the staff that is there. More nurses re leaving the profession by the time they are 40. Years ago , through our education, we gained some idea of what it would be like after graduation, because we were there long enough ( diploma programs 3 years, and baccalaureate programs 5 years at that time)to, as students, eventually be in charge of a unit on evenings or nights…That was an introduction to reality !! We learned what it would be like when we were sent out into the real world. People who are not RNs, or CNAs or LPNs should not be making judgments re what nursing is, nor making a judgement when one of the healthcare workers tells you what they go through. They are asking for community support; give them the support..not a response that is holier than thou.. WhenI managed one unit, the PhD social worker manager would not fully staff us telling us to use per diem ( which we burned out) or OT. We were constantly struggling to staff the unit. When the new VP who was an RN took over , believe me, she hired so that we were fully staffed…and she would spend 1/2 a shift periodically to assess the needs…She was a teriffic asset to the system….what did the 3 piece suiters do? eliminated her position and replaced her with a business person… I left, and the unit, i understand ,went downhill.

      Like

  36. THIS is exactly why I’ll never be a nurse. I don’t give a flip about people’s discomfort, even in the best conditions. But what this person described would require sainthood.
    Someone complains about having a massive heartattack? I’m like, “walk it off you pussy!!”

    Like

  37. I have been first in the ER after a motorcycle crash resulting in a 21 day stay in ICU. There are no words I can find to properly offer my thanks to the nurses who cared for me, that could ever come close to explaining how much I appreciate what they go through. I worked in the prison system for over 20 years, and there were times the stress was overwhelming. What I experienced was nothing compared to what they deal with.

    Like

  38. I have been lucky enough to have only been to an emergency room for myself twice in almost 50 years; the most recent time I was treated as a VIP and you don’t want to be a VIP in the ER. My hat is off to you and those who treated me.

    Like

  39. Simple note, I learned we will always have those patients. There really isn’t anything we can do about it. When a patient does thank you once in a blue moon stop what you are doing. acknowledge the patient and truly listen to them. Then you can hold on to the good, because those assholes will be your next patient. It really has made a difference in my days. I hope it will for you.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s